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Diocese of Rockville Centre

Office of Communications

2010 Press Releases

For Immediate Release

27 December 2010

ROCKVILLE CENTRE, N.Y. – December 27, 2010 – The Diocese of Rockville Centre announced that Allison O’Brien has been appointed director of the Diocesan Respect Life office effective immediately.  She succeeds Rev. Msgr. Francis J. Maniscalco, current pastor of Saint Thomas the Apostle Parish, West Hempstead.  The Respect Life office is now located in the Pastoral Center of the Diocese of Rockville Centre, in Rockville Centre, New York.

Allison O’Brien“I am grateful to Msgr. Maniscalco for his dedication and hard work during his tenure as director,” said Bishop Murphy.  “In 2006, I asked him to return to this diocesan ministry after his 13 years as communications director for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and he graciously accepted.”  Also in 2006, Msgr. Maniscalco was asked by Bishop Murphy to serve as director of a newly- formed Diocesan Public Policy Committee.  In June 2008, Msgr. Maniscalco was appointed pastor of Saint Thomas the Apostle parish. 

“I thank Bishop Murphy for his both allowing me to lead the Respect Life office and I am also glad to turn the responsibilities of the office over to Allison, who seems like an outstanding choice for the position,” said Msgr. Maniscalco.

“I thank Bishop Murphy for giving me the opportunity to serve the diocese in the Respect Life Office,” said O’Brien.  “It is absolutely essential that the Church continue to speak and act in defense of the right to life and on behalf of the dignity of the human person from conception through natural death.  I am glad to assist Bishop Murphy in maintaining this commitment.”

O’Brien has served her parish through involvement in many different ministries.  In May 2010, O’Brien, a parishioner of Saint Patrick’s parish, Huntington, earned a Master of Arts degree in Theology from the Seminary of the Immaculate Conception, Huntington and earned her RN in Nursing in May 1987 from Wagner College. 

 

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About The Diocese of Rockville Centre
The Diocese of Rockville Centre (www.drvc.org) was formed in 1957 and covers 1,198 square miles in Nassau and Suffolk Counties.  The diocese serves approximately 1.5 million Catholics (total population in both counties is approximately 3.4 million).  There are 134 parishes (1 campus parish) in 115 towns.  In 2009, nearly 16,702 baptisms, 16,900 confirmations, 17,537 first communions and 3,402 marriages took place in the diocese.  There are 19,261 students in Catholic elementary schools; 12,595 in Catholic high schools and 3,500 in higher institutions.  There are 55 Catholic elementary schools (51 parish or regional and 4 private), 10 high schools (3 diocesan and 8 private) and one Catholic college in the diocese.  Catholic Health Services of Long Island consists of six hospitals, three nursing homes, a community-based home for those with special needs and a hospice.  In 2008, Catholic Charities assisted more than 55,485 individuals who are poor, vulnerable and disadvantaged on Long Island.  (12/10).


CONTACT: Sean P. Dolan
                 Director of Communications
                 (p) 516-678-5800, ext. 625
                 (c) 516-510-0473
                 E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Good Samaritan HospitalFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact: Colleen Valdini
Public & External Affairs Manager
Christine Hendriks,
VP, Public & External Affairs
Phone: (631) 376-4104Date:         

Date:           December 23, 2010

                                    

West Islip, NY – Recent studies referenced by the American Heart Association indicate that developing heart-healthy habits during adolescence could have significant benefits later in life.  Obese children and adolescents are at greater risk for a host of health problems, particularly heart disease.  In order to address these issues, Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center offers a cardiology risk reduction program at its Center for Pediatric Specialty Care for children with high cholesterol, obesity, hypertension and a family history of early-onset adult cardiac disease. 

“Physicians should start screening children for these conditions earlier, since it is easier to address issues when parents are in control of their child’s diet.  Also, it is important that parents encourage children to get out more and be more active,” said Joel Harnick, MD, pediatric cardiologist at Good Samaritan’s Center for Pediatric Specialty Care.

The research shows a correlation between high blood pressure and high cholesterol in children as young as nine and the onset of heart disease later on.  The center is seeing an increase in childhood obesity, which leads to high cholesterol and insulin resistance (Type 2).  Due to a lack of exercise and poor diet (not enough fruits and vegetables), children are being put at higher risk for heart disease.  Heredity can also have a strong influence. 

“With so many children with special needs, it is most important to ensure that pediatric subspecialists are available to care for them in a timely manner and support each child’s needs as well as those of the family,” stated Catherine Caronia, MD, Good Samaritan Hospital’s medical director of pediatric critical care services. 

 Good Samaritan’s Center for Pediatric Specialty Care has the largest number of pediatric subspecialists in Suffolk County.  These pediatricians are trained in cardiology, pulmonology, neurology, infectious disease, endocrinology, gastroenterology, cystic fibrosis, sleep disorders and fetal echocardiography.  Since opening in 1997, the center’s primary goal has been to provide quality health care for children so they can continue to lead normal lives, requiring fewer hospital admissions and emergency department visits.  The medical center’s Division of Pediatric Cardiology recently received full/three-year recertification from the Intersocietal Commission for the Accreditation of Echocardiography Laboratories (ICAEL) for both pediatric and fetal echocardiography.  Good Samaritan was the first health care provider on Long Island to receive certification by ICAEL and is the first to successfully earn recertification.

For more information on cardiac services or Good Samaritan’s Center for Pediatric Specialty Care, please call (631) 376-4444.

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Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center is a 537-bed (including 100 nursing home beds), voluntary, not-for-profit hospital located in West Islip.  The medical center, which has more than 4,500 employees and almost 900 physicians on staff, had more than 30,000 patient admissions and more than 95,000 emergency room visits in 2009.  Good Samaritan is a member of Catholic Health Services of Long Island. Visit the website at www.good-samaritan-hospital.org.

Good Samaritan provides more than $54 million in community service and charity care each year.  The medical center supplies residents with the tools necessary to maintain good health.  This includes community lectures, screenings, health fairs and other community programs and services.

 

Good Samaritan Hospital

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact: Colleen Valdini
Public & External Affairs Manager
Christine Hendriks,
VP, Public & External Affairs
Phone: (631) 376-4104Date:         

Date:           December 21, 2010

 

West Islip, NY – Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center is offering “Powerful Tools for Caregivers”, a six-week course offered throughout the country.  The classes will meet six consecutive Wednesdays, from March 2 to April 6, 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm.  This series provides family caregivers with the skills and confidence to better care for themselves, while caring for others.

Caregivers will be taught how to reduce stress, improve self-confidence, better communicate feelings and locate helpful resources.  Attendees will also learn how to increase their ability to make tough decisions and balance their lives.

"I cannot recommend highly enough the ‘Powerful Tools for Caregivers’ training program,” stated New York Times best-selling author of Passages in Caregiving, Gail Sheehy.

A $25 donation is suggested to help defray the cost of The Caregiver Helpbook, but is not required to attend the class.  Preregistration is required.  Please call Good Samaritan’s Pastoral Care Department at (631) 376-4444 for more information and to register.

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Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center is a 537-bed (including 100 nursing home beds), voluntary, not-for-profit hospital located in West Islip.  The medical center, which has more than 4,500 employees and almost 900 physicians on staff, had more than 30,000 patient admissions and more than 95,000 emergency room visits in 2009.  Good Samaritan is a member of Catholic Health Services of Long Island. Visit the website at www.good-samaritan-hospital.org.

Good Samaritan provides more than $54 million in community service and charity care each year.  The medical center supplies residents with the tools necessary to maintain good health.  This includes community lectures, screenings, health fairs and other community programs and services.


            STATEMENT

DATE:      December 22, 2010

RE:          Death of Reverend Samuel Aririatu, 62

FROM:     Sean P. Dolan, Director of Communications/Spokesperson, Diocese of Rockville Centre


Apparently at approximately 11:30 AM on December 21, 2010, Reverend Samuel Aririatu lost control of his car on the Southern State Parkway (just west of Exit 31: Bethpage State Parkway) and hit a guard rail and a tree head on.  He died of blunt force trauma.

Father Aririatu, 62 was born July 7, 1948 and was ordained May 26, 1979 in the Diocese of Minna, Nigeria.  Since June 23, 2010, Rev. Aririatu served as chaplain at Peconic Medical Center and resided at Saint Isadore’s parish, Riverhead.  From December 2003 – 2010, Rev. Aririatu served as chaplain for Saint Charles Hospital. 

“I am deeply saddened by the death of Fr. Samuel,” said Bishop William Murphy, Bishop, Roman Catholic Diocese of Rockville Centre.  “He came to our diocese to place his priestly gifts at the service of our people.  He has served at Saint Charles Hospital with a sensitive and compassionate care for the sick.  In that he reflected the call of Jesus the divine healer that we priests be instruments to bind up the wounds of the suffering and bring Him to the sick and those in need.
I have contacted his Bishop in Nigeria.  While I have not yet heard from him or his family, I extend to them my prayers and sympathy with deep gratitude for his priestly life here in our Diocese.”

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About The Diocese of Rockville Centre
The Diocese of Rockville Centre (www.drvc.org) was formed in 1957 and covers 1,198 square miles in Nassau and Suffolk Counties.  The diocese serves approximately 1.5 million Catholics (total population in both counties is approximately 3.4 million).  There are 134 parishes (1 campus parish) in 115 towns.  In 2009, nearly 16,702 baptisms, 16,900 confirmations, 17,537 first communions and 3,402 marriages took place in the diocese.  There are 19,261 students in Catholic elementary schools; 12,595 in Catholic high schools and 3,500 in higher institutions.  There are 55 Catholic elementary schools (51 parish or regional and 4 private), 10 high schools (3 diocesan and 8 private) and one Catholic college in the diocese.  Catholic Health Services of Long Island consists of six hospitals, three nursing homes, a community-based home for those with special needs and a hospice.  In 2008, Catholic Charities assisted more than 55,485 individuals who are poor, vulnerable and disadvantaged on Long Island.  (12/10).


CONTACT: Sean P. Dolan
                Director of Communications
                (p) 516-678-5800, ext. 625
                (c) 516-510-0473
                E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Good Samaritan Hospital

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact: Colleen Valdini
Public & External Affairs Manager
Christine Hendriks,
VP, Public & External Affairs
Phone: (631) 376-4104Date:         

Date:           December 21, 2010

West Islip, NY – Recently, the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases released the first clinical guidelines for diagnosing and treating food allergies.  The report emphasizes that neither blood nor skin tests alone are sufficient when making a diagnosis.  Documenting a history of how foods affect an individual over time is a key component in accurately determining whether that person is allergic to a specific food. 

“The most important question in diagnosing a food allergy is whether the person has tolerated the food in the past,” stated Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center’s Chief of Allergy and Immunology Louis Guida, MD.  “While some severe allergies are obvious, parents of young children who have tested positive in a blood test should seek advice from an experienced allergist who performs medically supervised ‘food challenge’ testing.  Even when a food allergy has been confirmed, parents should have their children retested at some point, because many allergies are outgrown, particularly in the cases of milk, eggs, soy and wheat.”

 The first test should be blood work, with circulating antibodies, followed by skin testing with the allergen and actual food.  Finally, a food challenge should be done to see whether the patient has an anaphylactic reaction.  More than 11 million Americans, including 3 million children, are estimated to have food allergies, most commonly pertaining to milk, eggs, peanuts and soy.  The incidence of allergies among children has risen 18 percent in the past decade, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  At the same time, it is believed that a number of misdiagnoses have resulted from a reliance on blood tests.  These tests have emerged as a quick, convenient alternative to uncomfortable skin testing and food challenge tests, which measure a child’s reaction to eating certain foods, under a doctor’s supervision.  While  blood tests can help doctors identify potentially risky foods, they aren’t always reliable because they may fail to distinguish between similar proteins in different foods.

 “Doing a series of tests, not just blood work, is more time-consuming, but has been shown to be more definitive,” explained Dr. Guida.  “These new guidelines better enable physicians to make an accurate diagnosis.  For childhood allergies, it might not be necessary to eliminate certain foods forever, since intolerance can change as children mature.”

For more information on allergy services at Good Samaritan Hospital, call (631) 376-4444. 

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Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center is a 537-bed (including 100 nursing home beds), voluntary, not-for-profit hospital located in West Islip.  The medical center, which has more than 4,500 employees and almost 900 physicians on staff, had more than 30,000 patient admissions and more than 95,000 emergency room visits in 2009.  Good Samaritan is a member of Catholic Health Services of Long Island. Visit the website at www.good-samaritan-hospital.org.

Good Samaritan provides more than $54 million in community service and charity care each year.  The medical center supplies residents with the tools necessary to maintain good health.  This includes community lectures, screenings, health fairs and other community programs and services.